Africa by david diop summary pdf

Hello Lawrence, thank you for sharing that with me. That is a worthwhile aim. Have you set goals on obtaining your objective? Add to list. West7 - I would not have read a better piece this afternoon! Excellent is just an understatement! JhennyBarcy18 - How to interpret this poem? JhennyBarcy18 - Guys. Somebody help me. How to interpret this poem?

Sydney97 - This translation is incorrect Please, I'd like to talk to you personally. My email is : johnsonteey yahoo. I am published poet. Some of. My poems are here too. Foxx - OMGosh this is brilliant Fabulous Job Adrian W - Amazing job. Swain - Great!! Zai Luna Fortuna - Hello Lawrence, thank you for sharing that with me. Fretboard - Such beautiful imagery of the liberty gained after such downcastings.

Gn ancientsword - Hm! This is nice. Well written, Emotional. Love Africa. Proud to be One! Poetic Issues - Very nice. Thank you for sharing this beautiful poem. Cobbie C. Gemma Luescher - Yes a beautiful poem.

Yes I have seen middle Africa in its radiance and its fears. Rushing waters of the Nile. Sky King - Well conveyed and underlying truth solid. Excellent work! Matt Aka - inspiring John D - Patriotic and yet underneath I feel a sense of irony in the doe-eyed mythology. The last four lines sum kindle hard reset up.

Oyin - Strong!!! Ayesha - I love this poem!Africa, my Africa Africa of proud warriors in ancestral savannahs Africa of whom my grandmother sings On the banks of the distant river I have never known you But your blood flows in my veins Your beautiful black blood that irrigates the fields The blood of your sweat The sweat of your work The work of your slavery Africa, tell me Africa Is this you, this back that is bent This back that breaks Under the weight of humiliation This back trembling with red scars And saying yes to the whip under the midday sun But a grave voice answers me Impetuous child that tree, young and strong That tree over there Splendidly alone amidst white and faded flowers That is your Africa springing up anew Springing up patiently, obstinately Whose fruit bit by bit acquires The bitter taste of liberty.

Skip to content Africa, my Africa Africa of proud warriors in ancestral savannahs Africa of whom my grandmother sings On the banks of the distant river I have never known you But your blood flows in my veins Your beautiful black blood that irrigates the fields The blood of your sweat The sweat of your work The work of your slavery Africa, tell me Africa Is this you, this back that is bent This back that breaks Under the weight of humiliation This back trembling with red scars And saying yes to the whip under the midday sun But a grave voice answers me Impetuous child that tree, young and strong That tree over there Splendidly alone amidst white and faded flowers That is your Africa springing up anew Springing up patiently, obstinately Whose fruit bit by bit acquires The bitter taste of liberty.

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africa by david diop summary pdf

By continuing to use this website, you agree to their use. To find out more, including how to control cookies, see here: Cookie Policy.Africa, my Africa Africa of proud warriors in ancestral savannahs Africa of whom my grandmother sings On the banks of the distant river I have never known you But your blood flows in my veins Your beautiful black blood that irrigates the fields The blood of your sweat The sweat of your work The work of your slavery Africa, tell me Africa Is this you, this back that is bent This back that breaks Under the weight of humiliation This back trembling with red scars And saying yes to the whip under the midday sun But a grave voice answers me Impetuous child that tree, young and strong That tree over there Splendidly alone amidst white and faded flowers That is your Africa springing up anew Springing up patiently, obstinately Whose fruit bit by bit acquires The bitter taste of liberty.

“AFRICA” (poem by David Diop)

Like Like. I never really understoo the deepness of this poem when we treated in in junior secondary school. Not until my exposure to negritude. You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Google account. You are commenting using your Twitter account. You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email. Notify me of new posts via email. Skip to content. Like this: Like Loading Published by Integr8Africa. Next Post This WorldCup has been something else!

I like it Like Like. Not until my exposure to negritude Like Like. I love this poemmmmm Like Like. I love this poem so much, but did not understand it then its weight and pride and an African Like Like.

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Africa My Africa by David Diop

Email Address never made public.Both of them fought to end racial discrimination. Question 1. How does the poet come to know about the history of Africa?

africa by david diop summary pdf

Question 2. The poet did not spend much of his life in Africa. Question 3. Despite staying away from Africa, how is he able to describe Africa? Answer: The poet has heard his grandmother sing about Africa. In spite of staying away from his land, he knows that he belongs there. He knows that the blood that flows in his veins belongs to Africa. He feels the affinity to that land and the people. Question 4.

africa by david diop summary pdf

Answer: Red scars are caused by the whipping of the blacks by the whites in the scorching heat of the midday sun. Question 5. Pick out the lines that talk about the humiliation suffered by the Africans.

This back trembling with red scars. And saying yes to the whip under the midday sun talks about the humiliation suffered by the Africans.

Question 6. Explain this phrase with reference to the feelings of the poet about his country. Answer: The line shows the pride the poet has towards his country. He says that despite being repeatedly humiliated, the Africans try to stand and assert his independence proudly.

He is proud of his country for its trying to assert its independence. Question 7.During his literary career, he was a proponent of Negritude. Negritude was a reaction to the French colonial administrative policy of assimilation; this policy was predicated on the belief that Africans possessed neither culture nor history and therefore French culture could be used to civilise them.

Negritude desired a deep and almost essentialist re-grounding of Africans in the history, values, cultures of the Black people, while being open to friendship with other civilisations. The poem below by Diop reflects those values. David Diop died in an airplane crash in He was Africa my Africa Africa of proud warriors in ancestral Savannahs Africa of whom my grandmother sings On the banks of the distant river I have never known you But your blood flows in my veins Your beautiful black blood that irrigates the fields The blood of your sweat The sweat of your work The work of your slavery Africa, tell me Africa Is this your back that is unbent This back that never breaks under the weight of humiliation This back trembling with red scars And saying no to the whip under the midday sun?

He infuses Africa with human qualities, and talks directly to her. The sweat of your work …your back that is unbent. And it is this love which shines through, and which probably makes this poem have such an enduring legacy, across and beyond the continent of Africa. But this love, as exhibited in this poem, is not just about deeply felt emotion, but also individual and generational liberatory action [Mpondo, ].

So though the Negritude movement seems to have gone to its eternal rest. And the decolonisation movements of the 50s and 60s have borne nothing but dust. Though the postcolonial African governments have been the revolution that ate its own children for breakfast… There are still new love poems to Africa being written and spoken.

New African dreams being dreamt. New African decolonial movements. New flowers springing up. New fruits on the trees. May we taste true liberty. May our backs be unbent.David Diop's poem "Africa" reflects his hope for an independent African nation, and the problems brought to the continent by colonialism. Through this poem and other writings, Mr. Diop attempts to give a message of hope and resistance to the people of Africa. The poem "Africa" was published in David Diop's first and only book of poems, "Coups de Pillon," in Diop was born in exile, in France, in His mother was from Cameroon and his father was from Senegal.

As a child, he often traveled between Europe and Africa, which is how his interest in the continent and its people began. One of his early influences was Aime Cesaire, one of the founders of the Negritude movement. David became active in the movement, and his feelings and beliefs against colonialism and assimilation were expressed in his poetry, such as "Africa.

While some writers in this movement were bitter and pessimistic, Diop took a different path. Many of his poems expressed hopefulness and comfort for those in exile from Africa. He wrote about this in both a literal and figurative manner. For example, in "Africa," he personifies the continent as an angry elder.

What Is the Poem "Africa" by David Diop About?

The elder is aware of the impending revolution, and chides the narrator for thinking rash thoughts. More From Reference.The summary is well written with depth meaning. The summary would be a complete one if the ending lines were more clearly explained. The ending line of the poem "The bitter taste of liberty" means the Africans have to fight steadfastly and strongly to taste the fruits of liberty, hence the poet added the adjective 'bitter'. The poem "Africa" has great visual elements which make the readers visualize the heart lands of the continent with its natural beauty and traditional greatness.

The poem elucidates that Africa cannot survive without hills, rivers and the vast fields. However, as the time passed, there was a massive change in all these things. In the poem, there is a reference to the lose of African-ness in Africa. I recommend to use Custom Essay Writing Service to get more information on African writers and writings. David Diop is an African poet. He has written many poems, fighting against the racial injustice.

The poem Africa is about the glorious past of Africa, the nation, in comparison with the present situation of the country and its citizens, who are mere slaves.

Africa by David Diop 1 (illuminated by Sylvere Yao)

He uses a possessive pronoun to exhibit his love for Africa. The poet persona regrets for not being a part of olden Africa, wherein it had many warriors and rich savannahs. The poet persona has heard of the glorious past, about which he comes to know through the folk songs of his grand mother. He is proud of his colour and race. He happily announces the colour of his blood as black. The poet persona says that their black blood irrigated the entire grounds of Africa.

The persona vehemently transfers his pride about the country into a rage. The colonizers, who enslaved the Africans, drained all the blood, which was exerted from the Africans in the form of work and sweat.

The persona becomes ferocious and questions the silent submission of the Africans. He cannot digest the thought and sight of the Africans being bent, with scars for the whips held by the colonizers. The persona listens to a voice that talks about a tree, which is found alone amidst white and faded flowers. The voice addresses the persona as an angry man. Like the tree, growing patiently, Africans would also taste the fruits liberty.

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